Sunday, July 24, 2016

'This is revenge for Brexit': Motorists face another TWO DAYS of Dover traffic chaos as they say French deliberately put just ONE border guard on duty forcing thousands to sleep in their cars

Thousands of motorists were still caught up in the huge traffic jam by the port on Sunday morning (pictured) 

Frustrated motorists facing days of misery after getting stuck in miles of gridlocked traffic near Dover have questioned whether the chaos was caused by the French authorities punishing Britain for leaving the EU.
The mayhem has left 250,000 drivers stranded in 'horrendous' 10-hour queues after the French border force imposed thorough security checks in the wake of the terror attack in Nice last week.
Many holidaymakers were forced to sleep in their vehicles overnight and worried Brits have posted their fears online that this is punishment for the referendum vote on June 23.
Police have warned the disruption on the roads - with cars remaining stationary as tailbacks stretch for 12 miles - is likely to last for a further two days.
Social media users on Twitter have questioned whether the turmoil in Kent is a 'Brexit hate crime' while others have suggested the French authorities are giving Brits a 'hard time' by 'making it awkward' following the referendum.  


Cars and trucks queue up at border control on Sunday in the port of Dover after increased security checks were put in place in the wake of the terrorist attack in Nice
Cars and trucks queue up at border control on Sunday in the port of Dover after increased security checks were put in place in the wake of the terrorist attack in Nice


Traffic chaos continued in Dover today as the mayhem went into a second day
Cars and lorries could be seen queuing as they waited to enter the port
Traffic chaos continued in Dover today as the mayhem went into a second day (left). Cars and lorries could be seen queuing as they waited to enter the port (right) 
The huge queues of vehicles could be seen on Sunday as frustrated drivers queued for 10 hours to enter the port before entering France
The huge queues of vehicles could be seen on Sunday as frustrated drivers queued for 10 hours to enter the port before entering France
Drivers were forced to wait patiently on Sunday morning as thousands of vehicles queued to enter the port in Dover, Kent
Drivers were forced to wait patiently on Sunday morning as thousands of vehicles queued to enter the port in Dover, Kent
Tory MP Andrew Bridgen questioned why the French had put on extra security checks at Dover and suggested it could have been motivated by last month's Brexit vote
At the height of the chaos, just one member of the French border force was checking passengers' passports on hundreds of coaches
At the height of the chaos, just one member of the French border force was checking passengers' passports on hundreds of coaches
By Sunday afternoon, police said the backlog had eased but that delays and disruptions can be expected on the route for the next few weeks
By Sunday afternoon, police said the backlog had eased but that delays and disruptions can be expected on the route for the next few weeks
One user asked if the disruption in Dover - just 20 miles from Calais in France - was 'payback' from France because the UK voted to leave the EU. 
At the height of the chaos, just one member of the French border force was checking passengers' passports on hundreds of coaches - taking 40 minutes to check each coach.  
Port authorities said French border control booths at Dover had been 'seriously understaffed' overnight on Friday, with just three of the seven passport control booths open.
Tory MP Andrew Bridgen questioned why the French had put on extra security checks at Dover when the British border checks were among the strongest in Europe and suggested it could have been motivated by last month's Brexit vote.
Speaking to MailOnline, he said: 'Why have they put on extra checks on our border given our security record compared to theirs?
'We wouldn't exactly be considered the weakest link when it came to European security checks.
'If it's a reaction to Brexit – which I hope it's not – it's a strange thing to do to damage their tourism industry as a response a democratic decision by the British people.'
He added that it could be one of many 'irrational' moves we will see taken by EU countries to stop other member states seeking to follow Britain out the exit door.
Mr Bridgen said: 'The EU will be worried about contagion, which might lead to some illogical things for logical reasons.' 


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